COVID Vaccine Information

Please note:  Family Practice of Cadillac is currently taking names for patients interested in getting the COVID vaccine. If you are interested, please call the office at 231-775-9741 and choose option #3. There you will leave your name, date of birth, and a good contact phone number. As soon as vaccine becomes available, we will call you to schedule an appointment time.

The Health Department Plan is as follows:

By March 8, 2021, all areas of the state may, as vaccine supplies are available, also implement vaccination of people who are aged 50 and up with medical conditions and disabilities, as well as caregiver family members and guardians age 16 and older of children who have special health care needs (part of Phase 1C Groups B and C). This includes individuals in Phase 1B Group B who live in congregate settings (i.e., homeless shelters, jails, prisons).

  • people who are aged 50 and up with medical conditions and disabilities
    • Disabilities: The ADA defines a person with a disability as a person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activity. This includes people who have a record of such an impairment, even if they do not currently have a disability. Examples of major life activities include eating, sleeping, standing, lifting, reading, bending, concentrating, thinking, communicating, and working. In addition, the ADA also includes major bodily functions (e.g., “functions of the immune system, normal cell growth, digestive, bowel, bladder, neurological, brain, respiratory, circulatory, endocrine, and reproductive functions”).
    • Medical Conditions:
      • Cancer
      • Chronic kidney disease
      • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
      • Down Syndrome
      • Heart conditions, such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, or cardiomyopathies
      • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system) from solid organ transplant
      • Obesity (body mass index [BMI] of 30 kg/m2 or higher but < 40 kg/m2)
      • Severe Obesity (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2)
      • Pregnancy
      • Sickle cell disease
      • Smoking
      • Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes mellitus
      • Asthma (moderate-to-severe)
      • Cerebrovascular disease (affects blood vessels and blood supply to the brain)
      • Cystic fibrosis
      • Hypertension or high blood pressure
      • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system) from blood or bone marrow transplant, immune deficiencies, HIV, use of corticosteroids, or use of other immune weakening medicines
      • Neurologic conditions, such as dementia
      • Liver disease
      • Overweight (BMI > 25 kg/m2, but < 30 kg/m2)
      • Pulmonary fibrosis (having damaged or scarred lung tissues)
      • Thalassemia (a type of blood disorder)
    • caregiver family members and guardians age 16 and older of children who have special health care needs
      • Special Health Needs: including any physical, developmental, mental, sensory, behavioral, cognitive, or emotional impairment or limiting condition that requires medical management, health care intervention and/or use of specialized services or programs. The condition may be congenital, developmental, or acquired through disease, trauma, or environmental cause and may impose limitations in performing daily self-maintenance activities or substantial limitations in a major life activity
      • Those who qualify for Private Duty Nursing (PDN) through Medicaid in their homes should be prioritized to receive the vaccine.
      • Parent(s)/caregiver(s) of children with diagnoses including but not limited to primary pulmonary, nephrology, hematology, neurology, oncology, complex heart or breathing conditions, or because they are immune-compromised genetically or from medications used to treat their conditions should also be prioritized to receive the vaccine.

By March 22, 2021, all areas of the state may, as vaccine supplies are available, also implement vaccination of people who are aged 50 and up (part of Phase 2). This includes people who live in congregate settings (i.e., homeless shelters, jails, prisons).

By April 5, 2021, all areas of the state may, as vaccine supplies are available, implement vaccination of all people aged 16 and up who were not previously eligible.

Call the Health Department at 231-715-5557 or visit their website to get registered at www.dhd10.org.

Other ways to register are to check with your local pharmacy and area Council on Aging. Locally, the pharmacies we know for sure that are taking names right now are Meijer, Walmart, RiteAid and Family Fare but you do need to be a customer of their pharmacy. Council on Aging is helping the elderly, who have a hard time accessing the internet, get registered. You can contact them by calling your local Council on Aging or if you live in Wexford county, you can call them at 231-775-0133.

Munson Medical Center is no longer offering COVID vaccinations to the public. Please refer to your local pharmacy or Council on Aging to get help with registration with the Health Department.

Frequently Asked Vaccine Questions (FAQ)

Yes, unless you have a history of allergic reactions to vaccines, you should definitely get the vaccine. If pregnant or breast-feeding, you should check with your primary care for their recommendation.

District Health Department #10 continues to vaccinate individuals in Phase 1A of the priority group. They  are now on a schedule to receive additional vaccine weekly, and under MDHHS recommendations, we are expanding their effort to all of Phase 1A priority groups.  Clinics are scheduled this week for the health care provider priority group in Phase 1A and from now on, they will be on a rolling weekly schedule.

DHD#10 is currently working on planning for Phase 1B vaccination clinics. A pre-registration process for individuals was launched but all clinics are full for now. There is no early registration or sign-up right now. The Health Department will notify the public via press release, social media, their website at www.dhd10.org/covid-19-vaccine,  and their Public Health Alert as updates become available. If you have not subscribed to the Health Department’s Public Health Alert, please do so at www.dhd10.org/subscribe. They are asking for your patience as they wait to get more vaccines and schedule more clinics.

To see if what phase you may fall into, please go to the www.dhd10.org website.

The Health Department will have registration via their website, www.dhd10.org, as the vaccine becomes available for each phase. See the Health Department website for more information.

At this time, the Health Department is the only one giving the vaccine. As more information comes available, we will keep you updated.

With it being likely that  the vaccination will deliver a more constant immune response compared to the wide range of immune response that can happen between asymptomatic to symptomatic infections, the CDC does recommend those who have had a positive Covid-19 get the vaccination. The only thing they suggest is waiting 90 days after having Covid-19 to receive the vaccination. Also if you have had any plasma or antibody treatments, you should also delay 90 days before getting the vaccination.

Frequently Asked COVID Questions (FAQ)

Yes, unless you have a history of allergic reactions to vaccines, you should definitely get the vaccine.

Right now, we don’t have a specific answer for this. The health department will be spear-heading who gets the vaccine and how much our office will receive. We are awaiting direction from them on this. Keep checking back for updates.

The symptoms of COVID-19 are dry cough, fever, shortness of breath, and fatigue.

If you develop a cough, fever, fatigue and/or a new onset of shortness of breath, call the office first at 231-775-9741.  We will assess your symptoms and give you guidance on what to do next.

If you develop a cough, fever, fatigue and/or a new onset of shortness of breath before your appointment, call the office first at 231-775-9741.  We will assess your symptoms and give you guidance on what to do next.

The virus is spread through droplets from coughing or sneezing. The virus can live for extended periods of time on different surfaces and can be transmitted from touching hands to your face after touching infected surfaces. The virus can enter the body through the eyes, nose, and mouth so washing your hands and not touching your face is the first defense.

  • Metal–5 days
  • Wood–4 days
  • Plastics–2 to 3 days
  • Stainless steel–2 to 3 days
  • Cardboard–24 hours
  • Copper–4 hours
  • Aluminum–2 to 8 hours
  • Glass–Up to 5 days
  • Ceramics–5 days
  • Paper–The length of time varies. Some strains of coronavirus live for only a few minutes on paper, while others live for up to 5 days.
  • Food–Coronavirus doesn’t seem to spread through exposure to food. Still, it’s a good idea to wash fruits and vegetables under running water before you eat them. Scrub them with a brush or your hands to remove any germs that might be on their surface. Wash your hands after you visit the supermarket. If you have a weakened immune system, you might want to buy frozen or canned produce.
  • Water–Coronavirus hasn’t been found in drinking water. If it does get into the water supply, your local water treatment plant filters and disinfects the water, which should kill any germs.

There isn’t enough supporting information to determine this yet. Like any virus, we should develop an immunity if we get it and beat it but the severity of the illness may play a factor in that. Once again, there is no clear cut information yet on whether you can get it again or not. As soon as we get updated information, we will pass it on.

  1. People aged 65 years and older
  2. People who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility
  3. People of all ages with underlying medical conditions, particularly if not well controlled, including:
    • People with chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma
    • People who have serious heart conditions
    • People who are immunocompromised
    • Many conditions can cause a person to be immunocompromised, including cancer treatment, smoking, bone marrow or organ transplantation, immune deficiencies, poorly controlled HIV or AIDS, and prolonged use of corticosteroids and other immune weakening medications
    • People with severe obesity (body mass index [BMI] of 40 or higher)
    • People with diabetes
    • People with chronic kidney disease undergoing dialysis
    • People with liver disease

This is the reason this particular virus is so dangerous. Per the CDC, 1 in 4 people who get the coronavirus may not show any symptoms but are still highly contagious. Some people who have it may not even know they have it. This is why social distancing is being so highly recommended and why states are implementing stay at home orders.

As a virus, there is no specific medication that can treat COVID-19. Supportive medications may be used to manage symptoms. Let your doctor know if your symptoms become severe.

A vaccine is being worked on as a preventative but nothing has been approved for use yet.

If you have not been tested, you are not contagious after:

  1. No fever for at least 72 hours/3 days
  2. All your other symptoms have improved
  3. It has been 7 days since your first symptoms have appeared.

If you have tested positive, you are not contagious after:

  1. No fever for at least 72 hours/3 days
  2. All your other symptoms have improved
  3. Have received 2 negative tests in a row

Always be sure to follow the guidance of your primary care provider. Let them know if you have any questions.

The office is evaluating schedules daily. If a patient falls in the high-risk group, the office is doing its best to call and reschedule those patients. If you don’t get a call, then you are ok to come in for your appointment unless you develop symptoms of cough, fever, or shortness of breath. If that happens, please contact the office for further directions. If you want to reschedule because you feel safer that way, call the office and we will happily take care of that for you.

Please contact the office and we will take a message for your physician. The physicians are typically filling medications for 30 day refills at this time. If the State of Emergency continues past your refill date, call our office for further directions.

Please contact the office and we will take a message for your physician. The physicians are typically filling medications for 30 day refills at this time but if they feel they need to see you, you may be able to do a new TeleVisit. Call our office or check the TeleVisit page on the website for more information.

TeleVisit appointments can be scheduled for patients who may need a follow-up on anxiety or depression, medication refills, pain management, dermatology issues, and anything that doesn’t need an actual hands-on exam. Please call our office for more information or if you are interested in scheduling this type of appointment.

Check out the TeleVisit page on this website, where you will find more detailed information. If you have any questions, you are always welcome to call the office for assistance.

Antibody testing is not reliable yet. At this time, Munson is not recommending it. They are waiting for more reliable data on antibody testing. We are keeping an eye on this and will update as we find out more information.

Location
827 E. Division
Cadillac, MI 49601
MAP


Office Hours
Open 7 Days a Week
Same Day Appointments
Monday: 8:00 am 8:00 pm
Tuesday: 8:00 am 8:00 pm
Wednesday: 8:00 am 8:00 pm
Thursday: 8:00 am 8:00 pm
Friday: 8:00 am 8:00 pm
Saturday: 8:00 am 1:00 pm
Sunday: 9:00 am Noon


XRay Hours
Monday: 8:30 am 5:00 pm
Tuesday: 8:30 am 5:00 pm
Wednesday: 8:30 am 5:00 pm
Thursday: 8:30 am 5:00 pm
Friday: 8:30 am 5:00 pm

Closed
1:00 pm 2:00 pm for Lunch


Lab Hours
Monday: 8:00 am 4:30 pm
Tuesday: 8:00 am 4:30 pm
Wednesday: 8:00 am 4:30 pm
Thursday: 8:00 am 4:30 pm
Friday: 8:00 am 4:30 pm

Closed
1:00 pm 2:00 pm for Lunch


Telephone Directory
Appointments: (231) 775-9741
Billing: (231) 876-3410
Fax: (231) 775-9333


Emergencies
If you have an urgent medical problem after hours or on the weekend, you can reach the on-call physician by calling the answering service at (231) 775-9741. In case of an acute emergency, go to your nearest hospital Emergency Department at once.

News & Updates

Friday, April 2 ,2021

On Friday, April 2, 2021, the office will only be open for our COVID vaccine clinic. There will be no patient appointments available. If you need to get in touch with your physician, please call the office at 231-775-9741 to leave a message. Sorry for any inconvenience.

Spring Break Hours

Spring Break will run from March 29th thru April 4th. The following will be our office hours for that week: Monday – Friday 8:00am to 5:00pm Saturday 8:00am to 1:00pm Sunday 9:00am to 12:00 pm Regular business hours will resume Monday, April 5th, 2021. Sorry for any inconvenience.

Office Hours Starting March 10th, 2021

Starting on Wednesday, March 10, 2021, the office hours will be changing from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday until further notice. Weekend office hours will stay the same. Sorry for any inconvenience.

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